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Excercise And Fitness.

Exercising regularly, every day if possible, is the single most important thing you can do for your health. In the short term, exercise helps to control appetite, boost mood, and improve sleep. In the long term, it reduces the risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, dementia, depression, and many cancers. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend the following:

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For Adults Of All Ages

  • At least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise like brisk walking or 75 minutes of rigorous exercise like running (or an equivalent mix of both) every week.  It’s fine to break up exercise into smaller sessions as long as each one lasts at least 10 minutes.
  • Strength-training that works all major muscle groups—legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms—at least two days a week.  Strength training may involve lifting weights, using resistance bands, or exercises like push-ups and sit-ups, in which your body weight furnishes the resistance.

For Pregnant Women

The guidelines for aerobic exercise are considered safe for most pregnant women. The CDC makes no recommendation for strength training. It’s a good idea to review your exercise plan with your doctor.

For Children

At least 60 minutes of physical activity a day, most of which should be devoted to aerobic exercise. Children should do vigorous exercise

OBESITY.

Obesity is a multi-factorial disorder, which is often associated with many other significant diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases, osteoarthritis and certain cancers. The management of obesity will therefore require a comprehensive range of strategies focussing on those with existing weight problems and also on those at high risk of developing obesity. Hence, prevention of obesity during childhood should be considered a priority, as there is a risk of persistence to adulthood. This article highlights various preventive aspects and treatment procedures of obesity with special emphasis on the latest research manifolds.

Obesity can be described as the “New World Syndrome”. Its prevalence is on continuous rise in all age groups of many of the developed countries in the world. Statistical data reveals that the problem of obesity has increased from 12–20% in men and from 16–25% in women over the last ten years [1]. Recent studies suggest that nearly 15–20% of the middle aged European population are obese [2] and that in USA alone it is responsible for as many as 3,00,000 premature deaths each year [3]. Obese patients have been associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality relative to those with ideal body weight [4]. Even modest weight reduction in the range of 5–10% of the initial body weight is associated with significant improvements in a wide range of co-morbid conditions [59]. Obesity, which was once viewed as the result of lack of will power, or a lifestyle “choice” – the choice to overeat and under exercise, is now being considered more appropriately by the modern world as a chronic disease, which requires effective strategies for its management.

Obesity, in simple terms, may be defined as a state of imbalance between calories ingested versus calories expended which would lead to excessive or abnormal fat accumulation. Body Mass Index (BMI) is a measure of weight corrected for height and which reflects the total body fat and has been the most accepted parameter for defining over weight [10].

Optimal BMI increases with age. WHO also classified over weight according to BMI [11]. There is a very good correlation between BMI and the percentage of body fat in large populations.

Percent Body fat = 1.2 (BMI) + 0.23 (age) – 10.8 (gender) – 5.4

Where gender = ‘1’ for men and ‘0’ for women.

It follows from this equation that for a given height and weight, the percentage of body fat is about 10% higher in women compared to men. The reason for this could be that in women, the excess body fat is usually distributed as subcutaneous fat and is mainly peripheral (thighs, buttocks, breasts) where as in men there is a relative excess of body fat stored in abdominal cavity as abdominal subcutaneous fat.


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